Blog Banter 57: The Wrong Question?
Duncan Ringill

instruction01Kirith Kodachi nails up a Blog Banter on the subject of failfits and the prevention thereof.  To his credit, the direction he’s heading concerns the responsibility of the senior player in the education of the junior.  Granting that newer capsuleers’ undocking in suboptimal fits is a problem–for those new players if for no one else–sure, an experienced EVE hand can do a lot one-on-one to train someone who is just entering the game.

I submit, however, that this is akin to a driver’s education class in which the instructor talks about the latest Fast And Furious movie he’s just seen.  It’s sex education via dirty jokes when we could be using Ken and Barbie dolls or better.  Why tell another player how to fit, if the game were developed in such a way as to allow showing instead?

Yeah, in the game we have, you can share a particular fit through chat.  What you can’t easily share are the accompanying stats, or the logic you used to pick particular modules and rigs.  What can’t be shared trivially is the science of fitting itself, and it is one of the fundamental skills for survival and prosperity.

Give us an in-game fitting tool, CCP!  Shove it into the menu right down there next to ISIS, or (better yet) integrate fitting into ISIS.  Make this thing part of the tutorial, with samples engaging players on Day One in the basics of cap, grid and calibration with AURA as guide talking us through examples as she offers tips.  Enable stare-and-compare for the various modules and the sharing of fits within corps and alliances so that other players slip neatly into AURA’s place.

The old hand in EVE can sit virtually with a brand-new player; they can open ISIS at the same time, and talk or type their way through more advanced fittings.  Don’t force the teacher and the pupil to leave the game and communicate on forums about third-party tools that may not be interoperable.  Keep ’em logged in and socializing.  Build a schoolhouse for Kirith Kodachi; make it a place of learning whose products are fun and better killmails that we can share with a proud smile rather than a sneer.

Give the teacher tools, and bring enough for the whole class.