Failure
Sunrise Aigele

What has happened?! I am called away for too long, and I return to a better launcher, a better game, and entirely too much stIr over a Kickstarter venture. There are too many people who take the metagame too seriously. They should know better. But that is not an interesting enough subject to concern me.

The Kickstarter failed. This is beyond any denying. It has been changed beyond recognition from its original, and awful, conception. It should be closed, and the moneys refunded. Its authors should go back to a clean sheet of paper and, when they are ready, introduce a new campaign. To do that, they must first acknowledge where they have failed. As Sion Kumitomo’s bitter flailing about makes painfully clear, to do that, they must first see that there is no shame in failure.

There is no shame in failure. In fact, there is no worth in any act which cannot fail, unless “cannot fail” is meant as if spoken by a mustache-twirling villain. To create is to fail, again, and again, and again, and again. As the great writer Samuel Beckett said:

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Once you adopt this mindset, as painful as it surely is, you gain as well the ability to discern who your true allies are: they are the people who are willing to tell you to your face that you are failing, and how you are failing. The people who are telling you sweet nothings about how you are merely misunderstood, or how the evil community has turned against you, may (or may not!) be your friends, but they are not your creative allies and they are not helping you to improve as an creator. No matter how it pains him to, David must listen to Nathan.

I doubt that The Mittani reads my little blog, but on the off chance that he does: you failed. That means you tried. Try again. Fail again.

Fail better.

 

[EDIT: The Kickstarter will launch again in March. Best of luck!]


Comments

Failure — 3 Comments

  1. Hmm? I suppose you could see it that way if you draw the lines more broadly than I prefer to.

    I am saying that the blaming and the defending and the accusations–what people generally call the metagame–are distractions at best in this instance. If you are a creator, you must focus on the act of creation and be frank about its outcomes, and to do that you must be able to receive criticism. Not propaganda, not tearing down; criticism.

    You will know the real thing by its sting of truth.

    I have no interest in this project’s failure. It gives me no pleasure to see an effort fail, even if I believe that it deserved to. So instead of focusing on the drama I focused on what it would take to do it again, and succeed… or at least, fail better.

    If I have failed in this endeavor, I shall have to take my own advice and try again!

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